Seagrove
The History of Seagrove

Seagrove is a beach neighborhood known for its laid-back, welcoming atmosphere — and that’s just how one of the area’s founders, Cube McGee, intended it to be. Called an “unsung pioneer” of the area by the Walton Sun, Cube was responsible for the vision and development that made Seagrove what it is today.

1949-1970:  In 1949, C.H. McGee purchased 160 acres of Gulf-front land from J.R. Moody. The price? $75,000. Over the next five years, C.H. and his son, Cube, built five houses and began sending letters to family and friends about the remote, romantic and secluded getaway they were developing. Not long after, Seagrove Village Market Cafe opened its doors as one of the first spots for fresh seafood and drinks, and the McGees began selling lots on the land: Gulf-front lots sold for $1,000 and interior lots sold for $500. There was no paved road from Seagrove to nearby Grayton Beach at the time; the only way to get between the two was to walk along a dirt trail.

1970-1980: C.H. and Cube pictured Seagrove as a “gateless gated community,” free of noise and filled with people who appreciated the land and the community. By the late 1970s, Seagrove held a lively, tight-knit community of permanent residents and regular vacationers. In the early 1980s, the nearby development of Seaside attracted even more interest in Seagrove and the surrounding areas.

Today, Seagrove is a beach neighborhood that still represents the McGees’ original vision. Seagrove views its natural resources as its defining feature — and is home to Eastern Lake, South Walton’s largest coastal dune lake. The beach neighborhood also hosts a number of beach accesses, four of which were graciously donated by the McGee family in 2014. Head to this quiet beach neighborhood to experience a part of South Walton history.